I can’t stop thinking about Nambi

Why does this scene sadden me so? I should be happy because they are being taken care of and are in good hands. Hands of people who care enough to give them a name, love, a home, an education, protection and sense of belonging. I should be glad that even self-absorbed me can go visit them and put a smile on at least a face or two. I know it could be worse. They could be stuck in a war somewhere or be forced to become child soldiers or defiled, murdered, killed, street beggars and so many other dark things. I should be happy that they are fed, bathed and taken care of, but no…

Instead, the sight of them saddens me. My heart has been weeping since I saw them. Why am I so sad? Even I don’t have a proper answer to that.
The thought of Nambi haunts me. Her miniscule white vest and kitenge skirt fitted on her tiny frame like a table mat. She staggers in my mind quite obviously high on the lunch of beef, matooke and Irish Potatoes that she just had and is visibly still sitting in her tiny bowl-like belly which is now swollen. She moves about as if in a trance. There is no smile on her face but you can tell it’s not because she is sad. I can’t quite figure out what that expression is though, it looks a lot like resignation, and yet not quite. I can’t help but wonder what the future holds for this little being. Does she even know that she is only one of many other little orphan souls with no parents to claim them?

Nambi is only one of about 120 little people living at St Noa orphanage in Naluvule! There is Luka, Friday, Beautiful, Innocent, Gloria, Sarah and so many others who share about five to six caretakers among them. The Bible tells us that God has a plan for every single one of us. That His plan is good. I choose to believe so for these children and many other orphans or simply abandoned children in this dark world.
People rise up against all odds, out of terrible childhoods and rise to the top and awe all of us. This happens all the time. It could happen for one of these little ones, it will happen for some of them. But there is always those who fall by the wayside, those who never make it, those for whom life just never works out. None of us is completely in control of our destiny. None can completely dictate how life turns out. We can only do our best.

I choose to believe that Nambi and her ‘siblings’ around the world will rise above their circumstance. That they will be more than conquerors through Christ who strengthens them. That their caretakers will gain in strength and grace to keep raising them. That Good Samaritans will never tire in doing good to them.
I can’t change their lives; I can’t give them back their parents. God knows I have more than enough struggles of my own, but I can do what’s in my means to make what life has dealt them a little easier.

A little sugar, a lollipop, some clothes, blanket, toys, music, food, medical care, books, visits even just playing with them, these things we can give. We can’t worry about the future, there is not much we can do about it anyway, but we can make their now better. One day at a time they say… One little soul at a time…